JCAP

The Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) is the nation’s largest research program dedicated to the development of an artificial solar-fuel generation technology. Established in 2010 as a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Innovation Hub, JCAP aims to find a cost-effective method to produce fuels using only sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide as inputs.

  • Electrochemical scanning probe droplet cell for high-throughput evaluation of catalysts and light absorbers.
  • JCAP staff scientist Ian Sharp operating an amplified Ti:Sapphire laser for time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of light absorbers.
  • Color enhanced scanning electron microscope image of a silicon column and pit patterned by electron-beam lithography.
  • A first generation JCAP prototype of a tileable solar-fuel generating module.
  • JCAP graduate students Eric Verlage and Prineha Narang operating a spectroscopic ellipsometer for band-gap measurements of light absorbers.
JCAP's Vision

 

JCAP Science

Benchmarking is an objective evaluation of the activity of materials (e.g., catalysts), which is of fundamental importance for the development of energy-conversion technologies, including solar-driven devices for water splitting and CO2 reduction.

Questions:  To learn more about or to collaborate with the JCAP Benchmarking project, please contact the group at benchmarking@solarfuelshub.org.

Resources:  Benchmarking Database

References:  Relevant publications by JCAP authors are listed here.  Additional citations are referenced therein.

  • McCrory, C. C. L. et al. Benchmarking HER and OER Electrocatalysts for Solar Water Splitting Devices. Journal of the American Chemical Society, DOI: 10.1021/ja510442p (2015).
  • McCrory, C. C. L., Jung, S. H., Peters, J. C. & Jaramillo, T. F. Benchmarking Heterogeneous Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction. Journal of the American Chemical Society 135, 16977-16987, DOI: 10.1021/ja407115p (2013).
  • Soriaga, M. P. et al. Electrochemical surface science twenty years later: Expeditions into the electrocatalysis of reactions at the core of artificial photosynthesis. Surface Science 631, 285-294, DOI: 10.1016/j.susc.2014.06.028 (2015).